Author Archives: Irving Dai

About Irving Dai

Irving is a third-year graduate student studying topology and geometry at Princeton University. His mathematical interests include gauge theory and related Floer homologies. In his spare time he plays the violin (occasionally, and usually badly). He is fond of cats.

Gauge Theory and Low-Dimensional Topology (Part II: Smooth Four-Manifolds)

In the last post, I attempted to give an overview of the state of affairs in four-manifold topology leading up to the introduction of gauge theory. In particular, we discussed the correspondence between (topological) four-manifolds and their intersection forms afforded by … Continue reading

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Gauge Theory and Low-Dimensional Topology (Part I: Historical Context)

Hi! This month, I thought I would start a brief series of articles describing the uses of gauge theory in mathematics. Rather than discuss current research directions in gauge theory (of which there are many), I hope to give an … Continue reading

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Riddle of the Month (November)

Welcome back to this month’s mathematical riddle (and can you believe it’s almost December)! Today we have a neat logic puzzle with an amusing twist on the traditional knight-or-knave problems that are popular in the literature.

Posted in Math Games, puzzles, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Riddle of the Month (September)

Hi, and welcome back from the summer to a new series of mathematical riddles! I’ve decided to include only one riddle per post this semester, which will hopefully mean that I’ll be able to keep a more consistent posting schedule. … Continue reading

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The Man Who Knew Infinity (Mathematical Movie!)

Hi! For this post, I thought I would take a break from posting math riddles and take a brief moment to draw your attention to an exciting new movie premiering in the United States this week – “The Man Who … Continue reading

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