Online Recommender Systems – How Does a Website Know What I Want?

“People you may know.” “Other products you may like.” “Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought…” We’ve all seen these suggestions when browsing the web, be it on Facebook or Amazon or some other platform. But how do the sites come up with these recommendations? Sometimes they seem very far off (why should I become friends with someone when we only have one mutual friend?) to eerily tailored (how did you know my favorite band!?!?). This area of research falls under the broad category of recommender systems.

Continue reading “Online Recommender Systems — How Does a Website Know What I Want?” »

Posted in Math in Pop Culture, Mathematics Online | Leave a comment

Bridging the Gap 2: Eine Kleine NachtMathematics

Inspirograph

Created on http://nathanfriend.io/inspirograph/

This time of year, a new crop of math majors are stepping off college campuses and into the next phases of their lives. Some go to industry, some into teaching, and some into graduate school. Along any of these paths, one way to continue learning is to watch talks about and using mathematics from the internet, including sources such as TED.com and Vi Hart’s YouTube Chanel. Sadly, many of these talks leave a junior mathematician wanting more. In this post, you will find a sequence of interesting math talks that have been extended by further literature research by graduating seniors for your continued edification. The internet awaits – enjoy!

 

Table of Contents (Titles are jump-links in the post):

Continue reading “Bridging the Gap 2: Eine Kleine NachtMathematics” »

Posted in Math, Math in Pop Culture, Mathematics in Society, Mathematics Online, Teaching, Technology & Math | Leave a comment

On our path towards a more diverse mathematical community

Picture acquired from Pixabay (free for comercial use // No attribution required).

Picture acquired from Pixabay (free for comercial use // No attribution required).

As informed in an article published by the AMS [1], only 6% of mathematics PhD degrees conferred to U.S. citizens in 2013 were given to Hispanics, African-Americans, American-Indians and Native Hawaiian (more specifically 51 out of 857). Of those 857, women accounted for 231 (roughly 27%). Often we hear that we should improve such numbers. When reading the article the following question came to my mind. As graduate students, what can we do to help improve and promote diversity in mathematics? It will be tempting to say that we do not have the resources (at least not yet) to tackle this situation. However there are several things we can start doing that will later help us in our efforts towards having a more diverse mathematical community.

 

Continue reading “On our path towards a more diverse mathematical community” »

Posted in Advice, Conferences, Diversity, Mathematics in Society | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

When is Cheryl’s Birthday?

Photo acquired from Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository

Birthdays are a fun tradition that you get to celebrate with your friends and family once a year…that is, if you tell them when your birthday is.  In a logic puzzle that has been making the rounds on the Internet, Cheryl tells her new friends Albert and Bernard her birthday in a very unusual manner.

Continue reading “When is Cheryl’s Birthday?” »

Posted in Math in Pop Culture, Mathematics in Society, News | Leave a comment

How I’m surviving my first year of grad school (and still enjoying it)

IMG_0698

The cowl I am making

Starting grad school has been a bit of a roller coaster and everyone seems to say that the first year is the hardest. So far, I still enjoy showing up everyday so here is a list of advice I have received and have tried to incorporate into my lifestyle that might help if you find yourself overwhelmed.
Continue reading “How I’m surviving my first year of grad school (and still enjoying it)” »

Posted in Advice | Tagged , | Leave a comment