Category Archives: racism

Challenge for JMM2020

tl;dr I am challenging AMS and/or MAA to invite and promote a speaker and/or panel to a main stage to openly discuss the very real issues facing marginalized members of our community. For the past two years I have been … Continue reading

Posted in conferences, joint mathematics meetings, racism, sexism, social justice, women in math | 5 Comments

An Existence Proof: The Mathematicians of the African Diaspora Website

Guest Authors: Erica Walker, Scott Williams, and Robin Wilson In Mathematics, more than any other field of study, have we heard proclamations and statements similar to, “The Negro is incapable of succeeding.” Ancient and present achievements contradict such statements. One of the purposes of this website … Continue reading

Posted in history of mathematics, introduction, mathematics experiences, minorities in math, racism, STEM | 1 Comment

Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Raise your hand if you were just rejected by the NSF! Fun times, right? I don’t know about you, but I like to celebrate such occasions with a full re-evaluation of all of my life choices. So of course, I … Continue reading

Posted in mathematics experiences, minorities in math, participation, racism, sexism, women in math | 7 Comments

Here, There and Back Again: Developing Pre-Service Teachers’ Racial Consciousness Abroad

Guest post by Dr. Mike Egan of Augustana College. Here “If the streets shackled my right leg, the schools shackled my left. Fail to comprehend the streets and you gave up your body now. But fail to comprehend the schools … Continue reading

Posted in inclusive pedagogy, international study, math education, racism, social justice, supporting students, teacher education | 2 Comments

Complicit Function Theorem

This week, I was separated by small degrees from two separate acts of terrorism motivated by hate. (1) Students and faculty/staff on my campus had set up a local version of The Clothesline Project, in which survivors of sexual violence … Continue reading

Posted in bystander intervention, cultural pressure in academia, gender research, implicit bias, intersectionality, introduction, mental health, minorities in math, public scholarship, racism, sexism, social media, victim-blaming, women in math | Leave a comment

Still, we sing

This, 2017, has been a rough year for many of us in the USA who care about equity, diversity, inclusion, and basic human rights. We have seen attempts (some successful, but thankfully not all) to encroach on the rights of … Continue reading

Posted in equity, mental health, public scholarship, racism, social justice, social media, women in math | 9 Comments

Get Out The Way

Update June 7, 2017: For a follow-up to this post, check out Piper Harron’s personal blog, The Liberated Mathematician.

Posted in hiring, racism, sexism, women in math | 91 Comments

Two Days with a Chicano Mathematician: Bill Velez visits Purdue

When I was in graduate school in mathematics at Stanford University, I was very politically active on campus.  Not only was I an officer for the Black Graduate Students Association (BGSA), but I was an officer for the Chicano Latino … Continue reading

Posted in cultural pressure in academia, mathematics experiences, participation, racism, social justice | 2 Comments

Profiles in Invisibility

When people ask me “who is your favorite superhero?”, I usually say Invisible Boy (played by the awesome Kel Mitchell) from the 90’s movie Mystery Men. Invisible Boy’s superpower is, you guessed it, invisibility, but there’s a catch: he can … Continue reading

Posted in implicit bias, racism, sexism, women in math | 6 Comments

Inquiry and Equity

Education is, at its heart, about justice. It is the institution that empowers individuals to improve the conditions around them, to be intentional and involved citizens, to live meaningful and fulfilling lives. Or at least it should. Cultural institutions like … Continue reading

Posted in inquiry, racism, sexism | Leave a comment