Monthly Archives: October 2017

Complicit Function Theorem

This week, I was separated by small degrees from two separate acts of terrorism motivated by hate. (1) Students and faculty/staff on my campus had set up a local version of The Clothesline Project, in which survivors of sexual violence … Continue reading

Posted in bystander intervention, cultural pressure in academia, gender research, implicit bias, intersectionality, introduction, mental health, minorities in math, public scholarship, racism, sexism, social media, victim-blaming, women in math | Leave a comment

The Secret Lives of Mathematicians: Conversations with Students

This keeps happening to me: Student: When did you decide to become a calculus teacher? Me: I didn’t, and I’m not. Student: … And then I laugh reassuringly and explain that they are at a research university and that their … Continue reading

Posted in mathematics experiences, mentoring, supporting students | 7 Comments

On performing queerness and mathematics: Emily Riehl interviews Mike Hill

(Guest post by Emily Riehl.) A few months ago, after our post for Pride month, the i/e editorial board reached out to Spectra to request a guest blog post. That led to the wonderful interview that follows, which was conducted during … Continue reading

Posted in LGBTQ+, mentoring, pride, spectra | 2 Comments