Author Archives: racheljcrowell

On Mathematical Superpowers and Black History Month

“Which MATHEMATICAL superpower would you prefer?” Ben Orlin asked on his Math with Bad Drawings blog. He offered readers three superpower options: super approximation, or “the ability to immediately answer any numerical question to within 20% accuracy,” super visualization, or … Continue reading

Posted in History of Mathematics, Issues in Higher Education, K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Publishing in Math | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Some mathematical cheer

I might be stating the obvious here, but the longest partial government shutdown to date gave the U.S. a rocky start to 2019. Though the government has re-opened (read the AMS announcement about it here), a long-term solution still needs … Continue reading

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On the mathematical wedding controversy

Multiple news sites recently reported about a wedding planned between two mathematicians in which the happy couple decided to reveal their guests’ dinner seating arrangements as the answers to math problems.

Posted in Recreational Mathematics | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

On vision and mathematics

Today, I’m reflecting on vision and mathematics. That’s largely because as I write this, I’m also simultaneously evaluating whether a new computer I received as an early Christmas present is going to be a good fit for me or if … Continue reading

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A sampling of glorious snow math

Lately, the weather has seemed to taunt me. By traveling back from my family’s Thanksgiving festivities on November 24, I narrowly missed driving through a multi-state blizzard that slowed portions of my partner’s November 25 return down to a crawl. … Continue reading

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Thoughts on writing math books for kids

Kids’ math books: I’m not talking about textbooks, but rather cheerful math-themed picture books parents might give to wide-eyed, excited kids as holiday gifts, books that take math-obsessed kids on journeys to learning thrilling new math outside the walls of … Continue reading

Posted in K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Math Education, Publishing in Math, Recreational Mathematics | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Join In The Fun For #Noethember

The Inktober design challenge was created in 2009 by Jake Parker, an illustrator, writer and teacher based in Provo, Utah. Worldwide, thousands of artists participate in this endeavor, which challenges them to create ink drawings (pencil sketches under the ink … Continue reading

Posted in History of Mathematics, Math Communication, Mathematics and the Arts, people in math, Recreational Mathematics | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Tour of Robert Kaplinsky’s Online Resources

Robert Kaplinsky is a math educator and presenter. He also co-founded Open Middle, a website that encourages problems which require “a higher Depth of Knowledge than most problems that assess procedural and conceptual understanding,” according to the Open Middle website. These “open middle … Continue reading

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On Michael Atiyah and the Riemann Hypothesis

At the 2018 Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), Sir Michael Atiyah gave a lecture in which he claimed to have found a proof for the Riemann hypothesis. If Atiyah’s proof holds up, then the nearly 160 year problem concerning the distribution of primes … Continue reading

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On The ‘Math Section’ Blog

Swiss mathematician Elias Wirth created the “Math Section” blog earlier this month. Even though the blog is new, he’s already written several interesting posts, like this one about using the mean value theorem to catch speeding motorists. In an interview … Continue reading

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