Category Archives: Publishing in Math

Fractal Kitty Blog: A Tour

  Fractal Kitty: Making Sense of the Abstract, is a blog created by Sophia Wood and edited by her daughter, where she shares an assortment of fantastic math content. What caught my attention was the great number of math illustrations … Continue reading

Posted in Applied Math, Blogs, Math Communication, Math Education, Mathematics and the Arts, people in math, Publishing in Math, women in math | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Farewell, Roots of Unity

Last month, Evelyn Lamb (former co-editor of this blog) shared her final post for her Roots of Unity blog, which was part of the Scientific American blog network. I’m sad to see such a fantastic math blog come to an … Continue reading

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In honor of Black History Month

February 1 marked the beginning of Black History Month. Its origin trace back to 1926, when the historian Carter G. Woodson pioneered “Negro History Week” in the second week of February because it coincided with the birthdays of former US president … Continue reading

Posted in Black History Month, Blogs, Current Events, History of Mathematics, Math Education, people in math, Publishing in Math, women in math | 2 Comments

Holiday Math Treats

The holidays are a perfect time to unwind, reflect, and spend time with loved ones. For me, it is also a great time to browse the internet for fun activities to do. In this post, I highlight some of the … Continue reading

Posted in Blogs, Mathematics and the Arts, people in math, Publishing in Math, Recreational Mathematics | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Interactive Explorations of Hilbert Curves

One of the most famous and elegant constructions in mathematics is Hilbert’s space-filling curve. A nice description of Hilbert curves can be seen in Grant Sanderson’s (@3Blue1Brown) video “Hilbert’s Curves: Is Infinite Math Useful?” These curves have an impressive number … Continue reading

Posted in Applied Math, Biomath, Book/App, Interactive, Math Communication, Mathematics and the Arts, Publishing in Math, Visualizations | Leave a comment

A roundup of advice for writing about mathematics

April is Mathematics and Statistics Awareness Month, a time for increasing the understanding and appreciation of those fields. One way to communicate the joy and importance of math and stats? Through our writing. Just last month, the Early Career Section … Continue reading

Posted in Math Communication, Math Education, people in math, Publishing in Math | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

On Mathematical Superpowers and Black History Month

“Which MATHEMATICAL superpower would you prefer?” Ben Orlin asked on his Math with Bad Drawings blog. He offered readers three superpower options: super approximation, or “the ability to immediately answer any numerical question to within 20% accuracy,” super visualization, or … Continue reading

Posted in History of Mathematics, Issues in Higher Education, K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Publishing in Math | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Thoughts on writing math books for kids

Kids’ math books: I’m not talking about textbooks, but rather cheerful math-themed picture books parents might give to wide-eyed, excited kids as holiday gifts, books that take math-obsessed kids on journeys to learning thrilling new math outside the walls of … Continue reading

Posted in K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Math Education, Publishing in Math, Recreational Mathematics | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Musings on a Mathematician’s Duties

As I mentioned in my last post, I wish a genie would grant me thorough understanding of the proof Shinichi Mochizuki proposed for the abc conjecture. Much of this wish is motivated by a desire for the divisive debate to … Continue reading

Posted in Math Communication, Number Theory, Publishing in Math, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Blind Review Review

Theoretical computer scientists have been talking about double blind peer review, and it’s an interesting discussion. The current incarnation of this discussion started when Rasmus Pagh and Suresh Venkatasubramanian used a double blind refereeing process for submissions to the ALENEX18 … Continue reading

Posted in Publishing in Math | Tagged | 4 Comments