Category Archives: K-12 Mathematics

Joyful Learning in the Early Years: A Tour

With schools shutting down for weeks or the rest of the semester in response to COVID-19, many guardians are concerned about how to support or even direct their children’s education from home. This seems particularly true when the children are … Continue reading

Posted in Book/App, Current Events, Interactive, K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Math Education, Mathematics and the Arts | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Flygskam, Textbooks in Braille and More

This year’s JMM have come and gone, but many related posts are still available. Here are just a few that I recommend. “To be or not to be there: Conferencing in the age of flygskam” In this piece for the … Continue reading

Posted in Blogs, Current Events, Events, Issues in Higher Education, K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Math Education, people in math, women in math | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Math Values Blog: A Tour

Have you checked out the Mathematical Association of America’s Math Values blog? The site includes posts about inclusivity, community, communication, teaching and learning, and more. Please join me on a blog tour highlighting some Math Values posts that I find … Continue reading

Posted in Blogs, Issues in Higher Education, K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Math Education, people in math | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Posts to Ponder

I have recently read some posts that don’t necessarily have a common theme uniting them, except that they all grabbed my attention. Without further ado, here’s a little bit about a few of them. “What we mean when we say … Continue reading

Posted in Issues in Higher Education, K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Math Education, people in math | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Math Class and Comics Blogs

It’s that time of year again: For those in school, the fall semester is in full-swing and approaching the stretch where the winter holiday season doesn’t seem quite on the horizon. If you’re anything like me (averse to cold weather … Continue reading

Posted in K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Math Education | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Math Instruction for Students Learning English

As of 2016, 4.9 million students — or 9.6% of students in U.S. public schools — were identified as English Language Learners (ELL), according to the National Center for Education Statistics. While different folks advocate using different terms to describe … Continue reading

Posted in Issues in Higher Education, K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Math Education | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Mathematical Resilience

The MAA and AMS recently co-published “Living Proof: Stories of Resilience Along the Mathematical Journey” and the e-book is free to download here. The book was edited by Allison K. Henrich, a mathematician at Seattle University, Emille D. Lawrence, a … Continue reading

Posted in Issues in Higher Education, K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Math Education, people in math, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Inclusive Math History

Earlier this month, Anna announced on Twitter “It’s finally happened, I got tapped to teach History of Math. Since I cover so much of the euro white guy stuff in number theory, I want to do a People’s History of … Continue reading

Posted in History of Mathematics, Issues in Higher Education, K-12 Mathematics, Math Education, people in math, Uncategorized, women in math | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

On the National Girls Collaborative Project’s blog

In the U.S., March is Women’s History Month. The vision of the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) is to “bring together organizations throughout the United States that are committed to informing and encouraging girls to pursue careers in science, technology, … Continue reading

Posted in Issues in Higher Education, K-12 Mathematics, Math Education, Mathematics and Computing, people in math, women in math | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

On Mathematical Superpowers and Black History Month

“Which MATHEMATICAL superpower would you prefer?” Ben Orlin asked on his Math with Bad Drawings blog. He offered readers three superpower options: super approximation, or “the ability to immediately answer any numerical question to within 20% accuracy,” super visualization, or … Continue reading

Posted in History of Mathematics, Issues in Higher Education, K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Publishing in Math | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments