Category Archives: Mathematics and the Arts

Joyful Learning in the Early Years: A Tour

With schools shutting down for weeks or the rest of the semester in response to COVID-19, many guardians are concerned about how to support or even direct their children’s education from home. This seems particularly true when the children are … Continue reading

Posted in Book/App, Current Events, Interactive, K-12 Mathematics, Math Communication, Math Education, Mathematics and the Arts | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Tour of Intersections: Poetry with Mathematics

I don’t know about you, but between coverage of the coronavirus outbreak and political discussions looking ahead to this year’s presidential elections, I have been encountering a lot of stress-inducing content lately. Reading poetry is a welcome break from that, … Continue reading

Posted in Current Events, Math Communication, Math Education, Mathematics and the Arts, people in math, Recreational Mathematics, women in math | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

ThatsMaths: A Tour

ThatsMaths is a blog by Peter Lynch, an emeritus professor of the University College Dublin’s School of Mathematics and Statistics. Many of the posts on the blog are articles that Lynch has written for the Irish Times. Please join me … Continue reading

Posted in Applied Math, Biomath, Blogs, History of Mathematics, Mathematics and the Arts, people in math, Statistics | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mathematical Enchantments: A Tour

Mathematical Enchantments, or “Jim Propp’s math blog” is about “adventures in fantastic realms you can build inside your head.” The blog has been discussed a few times on this blog in recent years. Welcome to my tour of a few … Continue reading

Posted in Blogs, Interactive, Math Communication, Mathematics and the Arts, people in math, Recreational Mathematics | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Holiday Math Treats

The holidays are a perfect time to unwind, reflect, and spend time with loved ones. For me, it is also a great time to browse the internet for fun activities to do. In this post, I highlight some of the … Continue reading

Posted in Blogs, Mathematics and the Arts, people in math, Publishing in Math, Recreational Mathematics | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Interactive Explorations of Hilbert Curves

One of the most famous and elegant constructions in mathematics is Hilbert’s space-filling curve. A nice description of Hilbert curves can be seen in Grant Sanderson’s (@3Blue1Brown) video “Hilbert’s Curves: Is Infinite Math Useful?” These curves have an impressive number … Continue reading

Posted in Applied Math, Biomath, Book/App, Interactive, Math Communication, Mathematics and the Arts, Publishing in Math, Visualizations | Leave a comment

A sampling of glorious snow math

Lately, the weather has seemed to taunt me. By traveling back from my family’s Thanksgiving festivities on November 24, I narrowly missed driving through a multi-state blizzard that slowed portions of my partner’s November 25 return down to a crawl. … Continue reading

Posted in Mathematics and the Arts, Recreational Mathematics, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Join In The Fun For #Noethember

The Inktober design challenge was created in 2009 by Jake Parker, an illustrator, writer and teacher based in Provo, Utah. Worldwide, thousands of artists participate in this endeavor, which challenges them to create ink drawings (pencil sketches under the ink … Continue reading

Posted in History of Mathematics, Math Communication, Mathematics and the Arts, people in math, Recreational Mathematics | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Math Games That Make You Think

In the echo chamber, social media kinda world that we’re living in, network theory is playing an increasingly important role. So I was delighted, this morning, to spend several minutes playing an interactive game by the talented Nicky Case called … Continue reading

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On Tricurves

Tim Lexen, a mechanical engineer in Cumberland, Wisconsin, wrote a post about tricurves for the Aperiodical. As their name implies, tricurves are sort-of triangle cousins which have three sides, but instead of having three straight edges, each of their sides are … Continue reading

Posted in Mathematics and the Arts, Recreational Mathematics | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment