Author Archives: annahaensch

Math In The Capital

A few weeks ago I had occasion to visit the capital — and the Capitol — and as is the custom in Washington D.C., I had coffee with interesting people. We’ve blogged quite a bit here about the expressionless face … Continue reading

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Math Puzzles To Pass The Time

There are two types of people in this world: those that can only lie, and those that can only tell the truth. You might recognize that as the opening clause of so many knights and knaves problems. These are classic … Continue reading

Posted in Recreational Mathematics | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Black Hat, White Hat

Meanwhile, over in computer science…several days ago WannaCry almost brought the world to its knees until an anonymous tech blogger, MalwareTech, brought it to a screeching halt by activating a hiding-in-plain-sight kill-switch. MalwareTech blogged about the wild 12 hour epic … Continue reading

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Cook’s Take on Benford

Lately, I’ve been having fun reading John D Cook’s Blog. Cook is an applied mathematics consultant who blogs and tweets up a storm about all sorts of topics mathematical, statistical, computational, and scientific. He maintains 18 daily tip Twitter feeds … Continue reading

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Growing Up Gifted

It seems that Hollywood can’t get enough of mathematicians. Most recently, Gifted hit theaters. It’s the story of the mathematically gifted seven-year-old Mary who is living with her uncle in Florida. We follow Mary’s struggle adjusting to a typical public … Continue reading

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Divorce And Margarine

The correlation between the divorce rate in Maine and the per capita consumption of margarine, though compelling, is totally spurious. This is just one of the many such correlations that Tyler Vigen explores on Spurious Correlations, and in his book … Continue reading

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Does This Make Sense?

Some of my favorite questions to ask in class involve drawing up some sort of a mathematical model for my students and asking: does this make sense? Whether matching curves to the heating and cooling laws of my morning coffee, … Continue reading

Posted in Applied Math, Biomath | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Diversify Your Blogfolio

It’s March. As the sun sets on black history month and rises on women’s history month, I feel inclined, as I do every March, to draw attention to some of the great women who blog about math as well as … Continue reading

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A Circular Approach To Linear Algebra

This semester I’m teaching Linear Algebra for the first time, so naturally, I am constantly on the prowl for all of the linear algebra resources the internet has to offer. To begin with, I’m using a free online textbook called … Continue reading

Posted in Math Education | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

They Answered The Call Of Numbers

“Hidden Figures is a book about people like you, who answered the call of numbers,” said the author Margot Lee Shetterly, addressing a packed room at the Joint Math Meetings in Atlanta this January. The book, which tells the story … Continue reading

Posted in History of Mathematics, women in math | Tagged | Leave a comment