Climate Science Blogs to Follow for Earth Day

This blog has now made almost exactly one trip around the sun! We kicked things off last year on Earth Day with the mathematics of planet earth, and today I want to highlight some more posts about our planet.

A picture of Earth from low orbit. Image: By NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring (- Blue Marble 2012) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

A picture of Earth from low orbit. Image: By NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring (- Blue Marble 2012) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

On Azimuth, John Baez has been hosting a series of guests posts by Steve Easterbrook about the 2013 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report. (Find them under the “climate” tag.) Easterbrook is a computer science professor at the University of Toronto who has been focusing his research efforts on problems related to climate change.

Easterbrook’s posts are about the report from the first working group, but this Google+ post suggests that Baez may have guest bloggers write about the reports from the other two working groups as well. It also has an interesting discussion about why he is hosting the series on his blog. The report is available online, along with a fairly accessible summary for policymakers, but the blog format can feel like less of a commitment for readers. (I am among those who read the blog posts but wouldn’t have sought out the report.)

I’m glad Baez has had this series not just because I now know a little bit about what’s in the IPCC report but also because it led me to Easterbrook’s blog Serendipity. In addition to posts about various aspects of climate science, he has some nice ones about academia, including how to write an abstract and what skills he thinks are essential for PhD students in computer science. This roundup of climate models that can be used in the classroom looks like a useful resource, and this post on initial value problems versus boundary value problems is a nice explanation of the difference between weather and climate.

A little bit of blog-surfing from Easterbrook’s blog led me to the PLOS blog All Models Are Wrong by Tamsin Edwards. Edwards is a climate scientist at the University of Bristol with a physics background. Some of her posts that I’ve enjoyed include “nine lessons and carols in communicating climate uncertainty,” a post about her research on Greenland’s waterslides, and why as a climate scientist she does not advocate particular policies.

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