Dynamo: a photo-blog post

A few weeks ago, I attended an art exhibit called Dynamo, at the Grand Palais in Paris. It was a delightfully mathy exhibit featuring optical and kinetic artists from around the world. I don’t know about you, but I really like finding math in unconventional places. A great place for sharing some of that is the MAA Found Math Gallery, to which I have contributed a couple of times. Ivars Peterson’s blog, The Mathematical Tourist, also features many examples of found math. For this post, I wanted to share some of my photos from the exhibit: the ones I found the most mathy and intriguing, of course!

Light sculpture by Francois Morellet.

Light sculpture by Francois Morellet.

Moving sculpture by Hans Haacke.

Moving sculpture by Hans Haacke.

"Concave and Convex: Three Unit Dimensional", by Richard Anuszkiewicz.

“Concave and Convex: Three Unit Dimensional”, by Richard Anuszkiewicz.

"Ipercubo", by Davide Boriani.

“Ipercubo”, by Davide Boriani.

"Chromosaturation", by Carlos Cruz Diez. Slightly less math but by a Venezuelan artist, so I though I would include it.

“Chromosaturation”, by Carlos Cruz Diez. Slightly less mathy but by a Venezuelan artist, so I though I would include it.

 

The positioning of the fans held the circle of tape floating in the air. I thought this was amazing in terms of physics!

The positioning of the fans held the circle of tape floating in the air. I thought this was amazing in terms of physics!

 

This was in the "Permutations" section of the exhibit.

This was in the “Permutations” section of the exhibit.

Always exciting when you find platonic solids hanging in the air.

Always exciting when you find platonic solids hanging in the air.

I don't know the name of this artist, but I enjoyed the  geometric and fractally feel of this.

I don’t know the name of this artist, but I enjoyed the geometric and fractally feel of this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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yyy2 Responses to Dynamo: a photo-blog post

  1. Marshall Farrier says:

    Great to see mathy art, but one minor quibble: The largest of the blue objects in the “platonic solids” pictures isn’t a Platonic solid. Note that 6 triangles meet at a point. If they were equilateral, that would make the total 360 degrees. So, the triangles aren’t equilateral, hence not Platonic solids.

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