Author Archives: Karen Saxe

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About Karen Saxe

Karen Saxe is Director of the AMS Office of Government Relations which works to connect the mathematics community with Washington decision-makers who affect mathematics research and education. Over many years she has contributed much time to the AMS, MAA, and AWM, including service as vice president of the MAA and in policy and advocacy work with all three. She was the 2013-2014 AMS Congressional Fellow, working for Senator Al Franken on education issues, with focus on higher education and STEM education. In Minnesota she has served on the Citizens Redistricting Commission following the 2010 census and serves on the Common Cause Minnesota Redistricting Leadership Circle. She has three children and, when not at work especially enjoys being with them and reading, hiking and sharing good food and wine and beer with family and friends.

Update on the Census, Reapportionment, and Redistricting

  The first official Census took place in 1790 and was conducted under Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson; it was taken by U.S. marshals on horseback and counted approximately 3.6 million inhabitants. The original legal purpose of the Census was … Continue reading

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The massive omnibus funding bill and what it means for the math community

  As always, this post reflects only my own views. This post is a bit late. In the days before Christmas, President Trump signed into law final appropriations of \$1.4 trillion for fiscal year 2021 (FY21). This includes roughly \$900 … Continue reading

Posted in Appropriations, Congress, NSF | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

It’s a new day in Washington—demographics of the new members of Congress & some early legislation to help science

  JMM is over, back to politics and policy watching! The first day of JMM was a horrific one in Washington, DC. It is shocking and disgraceful, but arguably not surprising that events unfolded as they did. The double standard … Continue reading

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What does the AMS DC Office have planned for JMM 2021?

  The AMS has physical presence in four locations. Our headquarters are in Providence, RI and the print shop is in nearby Pawtucket. MathSciNet operations are in Ann Arbor, MI. The smallest office is the Washington, DC location. Two AMS … Continue reading

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Where will you spend the AY 2021-22?

  This time of year is a time when many of you will be making plans for the next academic year, or helping your postdocs find their next position. The AMS Congressional Fellowship can be a “postdoctoral” experience, or can … Continue reading

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In order to prevent an exodus of international PhD students, we must stand together

  Editor’s Note: Andy Hardt and Mahrud Sayrafi–the authors of this post–are PhD students at the University of Minnesota. Andy is in his fifth year of graduate school, and working on his thesis research with Ben Brubaker. Mahrud is in … Continue reading

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Urgent Action Needed on New Immigration Rules

  October 19 update: Thank you all for your interest. I received emails over the weekend from students, voicing concern and asking for further information about your own situation in light of the “duration of stay” proposed changes. First, this … Continue reading

Posted in Advocacy, Graduate students, Grassroots Leaders, Immigration | Tagged , | 3 Comments

What are your plans for the academic year 2021-22?

  On the job market? On sabbatical next year? Looking for a new direction to go with your math background? If you haven’t considered applying for the AMS Congressional Fellowship, I am going to try to convince you to consider … Continue reading

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COVID & Racism, their effects on the university scientific enterprise and what Congress is doing (or not doing) about them

  What a summer we have had. The killing of George Floyd and others has sparked renewed outrage over systemic racism in our country. Protests and demonstrations across the nation are calling for real change. The pandemic continues unabated at … Continue reading

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Our First Branch of Government Needs Science Too

  Editor’s Note: Lucia Simonelli just completed her year as the AMS Congressional Fellow. She served in the office of Senator Sheldon Whitehouse, and focused her work there on his climate agenda. She received her Ph.D. in mathematics from the … Continue reading

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