About the Bloggers

Adriana Salerno

Adriana Salerno, associate professor and chair of the Mathematics Department at Bates College, is the blog’s editor. She earned her undergraduate degree in her home country of Venezuela at the Universidad Simon Bolivar, then went on to earn her PhD at the University of Texas. Adriana was the AMS-AAAS Mass Media Fellow in the summer of 2007; as such, she wrote articles for the Voice of America. Adriana was also the creator and a writer for the PhD + epsilon blog, about the experiences and challenges of an early-career mathematician. Adriana’s main research area is Number Theory, in particular the intersections of number theory with geometry, physics, and cryptography. She is also very interested in the communication and teaching of mathematics to create a more inclusive and diverse STEM workforce. She is an alumna of the Linton-Poodry SACNAS Summer Leadership Institute and the HHMI-SACNAS Advanced Leadership Institute, and is committed to increasing the representation of minorities and women in the mathematical sciences. Adriana recently served as Visiting Mathematician at the Mathematical Association of America’s headquarters in D.C., from September to December 2016, and she is now editor in chief of the AMS inclusion/exclusion blog. Twitter: @mathyadriana.


Yen Duong

Yen Duong

Yen Duong is a freelance writer in Charlotte, NC. She received her Ph.D. from University of Illinois-Chicago in 2017, and before that her M.A. from UCSB and her B.A. in math and philosophy from Yale. She was the 2018 AMS-AAAS Mass Media Fellow at the Raleigh News & Observer. Her math research was in geometric group theory. She wrote a blog during graduate school, now updated occasionally, Baking and Math. She had two children while in graduate school, and tweets about them and freelance math/science/health journalism under @yenergy.


Anna Haensch

Anna Haensch

Anna Haensch is an assistant professor at Duquesne University. She was born in Germany, grew up in Vermont, and received her Ph.D. from Wesleyan University in May 2013. In the summer after completing her degree, she was the AMS-AAAS Mass Media Fellow at NPR.  Her research is in number theory, specifically quadratic forms and classical representation problems.  When she’s not doing math, she’s writing and tweeting about it, follow her @extremefriday.


Sara Malec

Sara Malec, Hood College, Frederick, MD. received her PhD from Georgia State University in 2013. After graduation, she was a teaching postdoctoral fellow at the University of the Pacific and a Project NExT fellow. She is now an assistant professor at Hood College. Her research is primarily in combinatorial commutative algebra, but she’s also interested in the scholarship of teaching and learning.


Beth Malmskog

Beth Malmskog

Beth Malmskog is an assistant professor at Colorado College. Her research interests are in number theory, combinatorics, and arithmetic geometry, and applications to cryptography and coding theory. Beth is originally from Wyoming, and received her PhD in 2011 from Colorado State University. She also writes for PhD + epsilon, an AMS blog about early-career issues.


Karen Saxe

Karen Saxe

Karen Saxe is Director of the AMS Office of Government Relations which works to connect the mathematics community with Washington decision-makers who affect mathematics research and education. Over many years she has contributed much time to the AMS, MAA, and AWM, including service as vice president of the MAA and in policy and advocacy work with all three. She was the 2013-2014 AMS Congressional Fellow, working for Senator Al Franken on education issues, with focus on higher education and STEM education. In Minnesota she has served on the Citizens Redistricting Commission following the 2010 census and serves on the Common Cause Minnesota Redistricting Leadership Circle. She has three children and, when not at work especially enjoys being with them and reading, hiking and sharing good food and wine and beer with family and friends.