Tag Archives: Origami

Flash Origami

 

My finished bowl and some nice origami swag from the flash fold.

My finished bowl and some nice origami swag from the flash fold.

Dr. Ryuhei Uehara at today's origami flash fold.

Dr. Ryuhei Uehara at today’s origami flash fold. Origami coach for the day Denise Wood of the AMS is in the background.

The JMM is a good place to love origami this year.  At noon today, the JMM app sent sent me a message about an “origami flash fold” at the AMS booth in the exhibit hall.  I had no idea what to expect but made my way over.  I was hoping a mob would spring up out of nowhere to perform an amazing choreographed dance involving origami.  What I actually found was a big group of people gathered around a table folding origami bowls.  I dug in and started working on a bowl myself.  The folding was a little tricky and I sought advice from my neighbor, who turned out to be Ryuhei Uehara, of the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, an editor of and contributor to Origami6.  An example of Dr. Uehara’s work in the area is depicted on the book’s cover–a single polygon that can be folded into two very different boxes.

Dr. Uehara's versatile polygon.

Dr. Uehara’s versatile polygon.

Math's best and brightest, folding paper at the flash fold.

Folding at the flash fold.

 

 

 

 

Origami AWESOME

Dr. Thomas Hull

Dr. Thomas Hull

First stop: Origami!  My JMM math fun began today with a “Folding compact manifolds without boundary” by Thomas Hull, part of the AMS Special Session on Origami Methods and Applications.  This was a fascinating talk.  One of my favorite features was Dr. Hull’s explanation of (a very elegant mathematical definition of) what kind of transformation constitutes an origami-type folding: it “preserves zig-zagness”.  Also, he led the audience to consider the extension of origami folding to higher-dimensional spaces–I had somehow never pictured folding three dimensional space before, and it was fun.  This session, organized by Hull, Robert Lang, and Erik Demaine (all featured in the excellent origami documentary Between the Folds), continues today in room 4C-3 at 2:15 with a talk by Demaine entitled “Computational Origami is Hard”.

Dr. Erik Demaine

Dr. Erik Demaine