Monthly Archives: March 2017

Math education in the Berkeley Hills: CIME 2017

(Guest post by Dagan Karp.) I want to tell you about CIME, a super awesome workshop, even though it’s problematic in some of the ways that academic research-focused workshops tend to be, in my experience. What the *#&% is CIME … Continue reading

Posted in conferences, equity, intersectionality, math education, retention, social justice | Leave a comment

Profiles in Invisibility

When people ask me “who is your favorite superhero?”, I usually say Invisible Boy (played by the awesome Kel Mitchell) from the 90’s movie Mystery Men. Invisible Boy’s superpower is, you guessed it, invisibility, but there’s a catch: he can … Continue reading

Posted in implicit bias, racism, sexism, women in math | 5 Comments

A different kind of problem

Sometimes I think that what makes me successful in math makes me kind of terrible in some aspects of “real life.” A few years ago, I wrote a post for PhD+epsilon about how close I came to having a car … Continue reading

Posted in ableism, cultural pressure in academia, mental health | 6 Comments

Equity in Review: Reflections on Equity Research Perspectives at the 2017 RUME Conference

SIGMAA on RUME The Special Interest Group of the Mathematical Association of America on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME) was established for the advancement of quality research in undergraduate mathematics education (RUME) and its implications for teaching … Continue reading

Posted in conferences, equity, mathematics experiences, participation, retention | 2 Comments

Inquiry and Equity

Education is, at its heart, about justice. It is the institution that empowers individuals to improve the conditions around them, to be intentional and involved citizens, to live meaningful and fulfilling lives. Or at least it should. Cultural institutions like … Continue reading

Posted in inquiry, racism, sexism | Leave a comment